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by Rebecca Shwartz

Paul D’Alessandro is retiring this year after working at Hudson High for 32 years, teaching the workshop class that began along with his career. 

“I’ve been working in public schools for 36 years, and it’s not as common now for teachers to work at one place for their entire career, but I chose to work here for these past 32 years,” D’Alessandro says.

“David Quinn told me ‘Oh, you should work here, they need someone to run vocational classes,’ so I took his advice and applied,” D’Alessandro says. It had started out as a dropout prevention class called STRIVE, convincing students who were thinking of dropping out to stay and attend the class. It became something much more than that as the years went by.

After he graduated with a Special Education degree, D’Alessandro was hired as a special education teacher to teach vocational skills, thus creating the workshop class. The class, now connected through the Carpenters’ Union Training Facility, would help students prepare for entering that vocation.

“It’s amazing, watching them grow from knowing nothing about building to keeping an eye on them as they make their own cabinets,” D’Alessandro says. “My students usually go into the field of carpentry and woodworking, either working the wood or planning constructions.”

D’Alessandro has built many different products for customers with the help of his classes, ranging from barn doors to wardrobes and cabinets.

Since D’Alessandro is retiring, the future of the workshop is unclear. “It’s up in the air, what’s going to happen with the workshop class, but students won’t be able to get training before going to the facility.” 

In addition to starting the workshop, D’Alessandro has been involved in other important school programs, such as coteaching. The STRIVE class came to an end five years ago due to the fact that students weren’t passing MCAS. At that point D’Alessandro re-entered the classroom. When coteaching, a program that brought special education and regular education teachers together in the classroom, started, D’Alessandro taught with English teacher Shane McArdle and physics teacher Kate Chatellier. He taught Academic Support and two classes of woodworking as well.

“Even though I’m retiring, every moment here was memorable for me; every success and failure, teaching with McArdle, and all the years I spent here,” he said.

“He’s a great guy, and I’m going to miss him,” McArdle said. “He helped me build a shed, built an adjustable stool for my three year old. He’s great.”

“This was a great ride,” D’Alessandro said, “and it’s something I won’t forget.”

 

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Seniors performing in the Baccalaureate ceremony stand on stage after walking in. | by Siobhan Richards

Members of the Hudson High School class of 2017 gathered in the HHS Auditorium on May 30 for the annual baccalaureate ceremony honoring their grade. More than 20 seniors read or performed music for their classmates, friends, and family while HHS staff members Reed Prior and Rebecca Appel also spoke at the ceremony.

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by Rachel McComiskey and Jordan Cullen

The Spirit Committee brought back Field Day on April 13. During the last block of the day, students gathered in the gym to watch their classmates and faculty compete in games. Students and faculty competed in knockout, musical chairs, a three-legged race, a shoe scramble, Pictionary, and a food eating race. The senior class won three out of the six games, therefore winning the Field Day competition.

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by Ally Jensen

by Big Red Staff

It’s spirit week! Check this page every afternoon for photos from that day’s spirit theme! Also, follow us on Instagram (TheBigRedHawks) and on Twitter (@thebigredhawks) for more spirit week photos and updates.

Thursday will be Color Day and will end with a “field day” event during fifth block.

Monday: Sports Day

Tuesday: Hawaiian Day

Wednesday: PJ Day

Thursday: Color Day

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Seniors perform in their last musical. | by Collin McMahon

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by Siobhan Richards and Collin McMahon

The boys hockey team finished their season with a loss against the Groton-Dunstable Crusaders. The final score of the game was 3-1 with a goal by senior Thomas Sansone. The team’s final season record was 7-10-3.

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by Dakota Antelman

Marchers from across New England descended on the Boston Common earlier this month to protest President Donald Trump and support the various groups he insulted in his campaign or threatened with his policy proposals. 

Taking place the day after Trump’s inauguration, the march was one of hundreds across the world. It attracted, according to organizers and Boston Police, 175,000 people to the Boston Common and featured speeches from high-profile Massachusetts Democrats. Nearly a week later, more protests erupted across the country in opposition to a ban on immigration from seven predominantly Muslim countries.

Several HHS students and staff members attended. After the march, the Big Red spoke to two of these students about their experiences, their beliefs, and their hopes for the future.

 

Eva Tipps

The Women’s March filled the Boston Common with more people than many onlookers can remember. Like many other protests across the country, it surpassed expectations of attendance.

Elizabeth Warren, a US Senator for Massachusetts and a popular voice among progressive Democrats, headlined the pre-march rally at the Boston Common, delivering a speech in which she committed to fighting Donald Trump even though her party represents the minority in both houses of Congress.

Warren was, however, just one of several liberal leaders who attended the rally. Boston Mayor Marty Walsh declared on behalf of the city of Boston that he would fight Trump. Days after that speech, his words were indeed put to the test when Trump announced he would put pressure on sanctuary cities like Boston to turn over undocumented immigrants to the federal government.

Likewise, the two were joined by Senator Ed Markey who touched on similar themes in his speech.

Eva Tipps

As many marches were still taking place on January 21, White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer falsely claimed that Donald Trump’s inauguration drew the largest audience in history in an aggressive briefing of reporters in Washington, D.C.

The next day, in an interview with NBC’s Chuck Todd, Kellyanne Conway, a counselor to President Trump, defended Spicer’s comments by saying that he had not lied. Instead, she said, “he used alternative facts.”

The events came after Trump had spent much of his campaign insulting the press and threatening to change libel laws in his administration. During the Boston Women’s March, some participants could be heard chanting in support of a free press.

Clement Doucette

Trump’s first week in office began with women’s marches around the world. It ended with protestors flocking to airports across the US to oppose an executive order by the president that banned immigration from seven predominantly Muslim countries for 120 days while the government developed “extreme vetting” programs for refugees.

Those protests were sparked when 12 refugees were detained at JFK Airport in New York City by officials citing Trump’s order and began to thin when a federal judge ruled that refugees in transit to the US should be admitted and as the White House announced that all foreigners holding Green Cards would still be able to enter the US.

For students and progressive leaders alike, the early protests against President Trump are and will continue to be a favored tactic in resisting a government over which their party has little control.

 

Eva Tipps

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Regan Gannon spins away from the defense of Hudson's Emily O'Neil in the second quarter. | by Dakota Antelman

by Dakota Antelman

Girls basketball came from behind to beat the Clinton Gaels at home Thursday afternoon. With the 48-44 victory, the Hawks snapped a three-game losing streak and improved their record to 2-4 heading into the new year.

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by Rachel McComiskey